FMC1201 Freshman Seminar: Is Computer Science Science?

Modular Credits: 4
Workload: 0-3-0-4-3
Prerequisite(s): Nil
Preclusion(s): Nil
Cross-listing(s): Nil
The objective of this seminar is for the freshmen to gain a fundamental understanding of Computer Science and a broader perspective of how it relates to other sciences. The major topics include the similarity and differences between Computer Science and the traditional sciences (Physics, Biology, Mathematics, etc.), the objective and methodology in Science and the scientific aspects of computation (hardware, software, systems, etc.). This module will be graded as "Completed Satisfactory/Completed Unsatisfactory (CS/ CU)".

top

 

FMC1202 Freshman Seminar: The Wonderfully Weird World of Software

Modular Credits: 4
Workload: 0-3-0-4-3
Prerequisite(s): Nil
Preclusion(s): Nil
Cross-listing(s): Nil
In this course, students will examine a number of interesting real-world software phenomena drawn from diverse domains such as viruses, embedded applications, search engines, web applications, mobile applications, operating systems, virtual reality applications and security applications. The mode of delivery is instructor-led discussions flanked with preparatory and follow-up assignments. The discussion offers an "outside-in" look at the respective software, leading to an increased awareness and interest in the related computer science subject areas. Small group teaching with emphasis on inquiry, discovery and exchange of ideas will be used. This module will be graded as "Completed Satisfactory/Completed Unsatisfactory (CS/CU)".

top

 

FMC1203 Freshman Seminar: Computational Thinking

Modular Credits: 4
Workload: 0-3-0-4-3
Prerequisite(s): Nil
Preclusion(s): Nil
Cross-listing(s): Nil
The reach and applicability of computing is vast — essentially all of human endeavours. To deal with the complexity, computer scientists have developed thinking methods that are suited for scaling to large and difficult problems. In this course, students will be exposed to computational thinking methods such as the use of abstraction, compositionality, divide and conquer, caching, reduction, invariants, randomness, and parallelism. Students will do case studies to compare and contrast computational thinking with thinking methods used to organise non-computing domains. Small group teaching with emphasis on discovery and insights as well as communication skills will be used. This module will be assessed on a grade basis.

top

 

FMC1204 Freshman Seminar: Innovating Radically with IT

Modular Credits: 4
Workload: 0-3-0-4-3
Prerequisite(s): Nil
Preclusion(s): Nil
Cross-listing(s): Nil
This module provides freshmen with insights into how IT has radically transformed industries in the past few decades. A few key industries that are strategic to Singapore (as documented in the iN2015 national IT strategic plan) will be covered. Freshmen will develop insights through readings, field research, and interviews with IT pioneers in these industries. They will share their insights with the class through seminars. Freshmen will then undertake a forward looking project to interpret how emerging forms of IT may be exploited to radically transform these key industries in the future. This module will be graded as "Completed Satisfactory/Completed Unsatisfactory (CS/CU)

top

 

FMC1205 Freshman Seminar: Practical Information Security

Modular Credits: 4
Workload: 0-3-0-4-3
Prerequisite(s): Nil
Preclusion(s): Nil
Cross-listing(s): Nil
In order to appreciate the science of information security, one needs to understand how computer systems can be compromised by insecured design and implementation. In this course, students will be exposed to common security vulnerabilities of modern computing systems, the standard tools that can be deployed to guard against such vulnerabilities, and the best practices to design systems that can minimise not only known security issues, but also future risk arising from currently unknown security attacks. Students will do case studies to investigate how they could potentially compromise some standard computing systems, and propose solutions to mitigate against the risks.

 

top

FMC1206 Freshman Seminar: Computing for a Better World

Modular Credits: 4
Workload: 0-3-0-4-3
Prerequisite(s): Nil
Preclusion(s): Nil
Cross-listing(s): Nil
Poverty, energy, disease, and environment are a few of the grand challenges that humanity faces today.  Computing, being a field that underlies modern sciences, plays an important role in addressing these challenges.  This module aims to expose students to how computing is used to tackle these and other grand challenges faced by humanity.  Topics depend on the latest scientific development.   Example topics include the use of computing to facilitate efficient farming, monitor the environments, simulate climate change, sequence genome, detect pandemic outbreak, and search for a cure for diseases. This module will be graded as “Completed Satisfactory/Completed Unsatisfactory (CS/CU)”.

top