LIM Shi Ying

Assistant Professor
Ph.D. (Information Systems, The University of Texas at Austin)
M.P.H. (Health Management, Yale University)
B.A. (Molecular & Cell Biology: Immunology, 2nd Major: Economics, University of California, Berkeley)
COM2-04-28
651 64654

Research Areas

Research Interests

  • Entrepreneurial Strategy and Product Design
  • Health Information Technology Design
  • Software Development
  • Digital Ecosystems

Profile

Lim Shi Ying is an assistant professor in the Department of Information Systems and Analytics at the National University of Singapore (NUS). She did her doctoral work in Information Systems at the McCombs School of Business at The University of Texas at Austin, and her BA and MPH from the University of California, Berkeley and Yale University, respectively. Prior to joining academia, she worked for hospitals in the United States and Singapore, the World Health Organization, and health IT startups. Shi Ying’s research focuses on digital entrepreneurship, health IT design, digital disruptions and ecosystem strategy. Her work has been nominated best papers at leading academic conferences such as the International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS), and the Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences (HICSS).

Current Projects

  • Entrepreneurial Design amidst uncertainty and resource constraints
  • Entrepreneurial Entry into Established Ecosystems
  • Strategies for Complex Business Ecosystems
  • Agile Software Development

Selected Publications

  • Tanriverdi, H., & Lim, S. Y. (2017). How to Survive and Thrive in Complex, Hypercompetitive, and Disruptive ecosystems? The Roles of IS-enabled Capabilities. Proceedings of the 38th International Conference on Information Systems (ICIS), Seoul, Korea.

    -Nominated Best Theory Development Paper

  • Jarvenpaa, S. L., Cantu, C., & Lim, S. Y. (2017). Trust in virtual online environments. The Wiley Blackwell handbook of the psychology of the internet at work, 103-130.

  • Anderson, E., Lim, S. Y., & Joglekar, N. (2017, January). Are More Frequent Releases Always Better? Dynamics of Pivoting, Scaling, and the Minimum Viable Product. In Proceedings of the 50th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences

    - Nominated Best Paper

  • Lim, S. Y., & Anderson, E. G. (2016, January). Institutional Barriers Against Innovation Diffusion: From the Perspective of Digital Health Startups. In System Sciences (HICSS), 2016 49th Hawaii International Conference on (pp. 3328-3337). IEEE.

  • Lim, S. Y., Jarvenpaa, S. L., & Lanham, H. J. (2015). Barriers to Interorganizational knowledge transfer in post-hospital care transitions: review and directions for information systems research. Journal of Management Information Systems32 (3), 48-74.

  • Lim, S. Y., Jarvenpaa, S. L., & Lanham, H. J. (2015, January). Review of Research on Knowledge Transfer in Care Transitions: Trust-Enhancing Principles for Information Systems Design. In System Sciences (HICSS), 2015 48th Hawaii International Conference on (pp. 3148-3157). IEEE.

    Nominated Best Paper

Awards & Honours

Teaching (2019/2020)

  • BT4016: Risk Analytics for Financial Services
  • IS4250: Healthcare IT and Analytics